How to Create a Java EE 6 Application with JSF 2, EJB 3.1, JPA, and NetBeans IDE 6.8

There are many articles and tutorials out there that discuss how to use the individual technologies in Java EE 6, e.g., JSF 2, EJB 3.1, JPA, etc, to develop an application, but I haven’t seen one that puts together the said technologies and showcases them in one tutorial with an end-to-end demonstration. As such, I thought I would create one here for the benefit of those who are new to JEE6 and NetBeans IDE 6.8 and those who are seriously looking at NetBeans IDE 6.8 as a tool for developing their enterprise applications.

This article published on Netbeans Zone aims to provide detailed steps to develop a web-based application based on technologies in the JEE6 specs, i.e., JavaServer Faces 2.0 (JSF), Enterprise Java Beans 3.1 (Session Bean and Message-Driven Bean) and Java Persistence API (JPA) with the help of NetBeans IDE 6.8 as the development & deployment tool. The example in this tutorial creates a web application called “CustomerApp” that performs only the Retrieve and Update functions of CRUD on the customer records provided by the NetBeans Sample database served by the Glassfish built-in database server, JavaDB (Derby). In addition to the above-mentioned technologies from JEE6, PrimeFaces for JSF2 will also be used as the Ajax-based Framework for the Web UI portion which is lacking in the stack. So, this tutorial also discusses how PrimeFaces can be integrated into NetBeans IDE and to enable Ajax capabilities for Web projects.

The objective of the tutorial is to demonstrate the ease of using the various JEE6 technologies and putting them together to create an enterprise-ready web-based application. Although the application is developed for demo purposes, its architecture represents the best practices in developing an enterprise application, whereby modularity, scalability, and reusability are taken into consideration.

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Native Seam Support Wanted for NetBeans & Glassfish

Jboss Seam logoJboss SEAM is by far the best programming framework for Java EE development as it solves most of the problems which arose for achieving a true MVC 2 implementation. All of the other frameworks like Struts and Spring MVC when used with presentation layer specifications like JSP and JSF 1.x while almost succeeding in the arena, when it came to agile development, they created at least as many other problems – if not more - as the ones they solved. Enter Jboss Seam which uses JSF 2 for the presentation layer which is truely a Java EE specification and for the rest of the MVC paradigm which consists of the business logic and the data persistence layer achieved respectively by EJB and JPA.

Joesph Faisal Nusairat had this to say in his book Beginning Jboss Seam from Novice to Professional. 

For years developers realized that the JavaServer Pages (JSP)/servlets paradigm was not enough to create enterprise-level web pages. That model provided the capability for a web tier that could pass objects from the client to the server, but essentially that was it. For most developers, this simple paradigm was not enough; more-complex operations were needed, and developers found themselves writing infrastructure code to deal with the shortcomings of the Servlet specification. Eventually, all the ideas learned from creating custom infrastructure code resulted in the web frameworks we know today, such as Apache’s Struts and Tapestry, OpenSymphony’s WebWork, and so forth. The Java community also got together and through the Java Community Process (JCP) created the JSF specification to tackle some of the issues raised and deal with the shortcomings of the Servlet specification.

Even though we now have web and business tiers with improved functionality, we have still been forced to create the plumbing code needed to connect them together. With Seam, however, these two areas can now focus more exclusively on what they do best—presentation and business logic.

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Techniques For Integrating Hibernate Into Legacy Java Code – Part 1

If you’re like me, you spend a lot of time dealing with legacy code that, for whatever reason, does not take advantage of modern methodologies and libraries. I’ve taken over Java projects that contain hundreds of thousands of lines of code and not a single third-party jar other than a JDBC driver! One of the most common examples of this is the implementation of the data access layer. These days, the de facto methodology involves Hibernate and DAOs, usually managed by Spring.

This article will detail the steps I recently took to covert a large application from custom-written data access to Hibernate and Spring using the refactoring facilities in Eclipse. The key with this refactorization is to get the existing business logic code (Struts Actions, JSPs, Delegate classes, Business Service classes, etc. ) to access the datastore using Hibernate, managed by Spring, without manually changing any of that code directly. Part 1 will include creating the Hibernate data object classes, DAOs, and refactoring the existing code to work with these newly created types. Part 2 will conclude the project with integration of the Hibernate DAOs and wiring everything up with Spring.

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What is the average first year raise for a software developer?

I work as a software developer in Austin, TX. I just graduated last December from Univ. of Texas and started at my current job at the beginning of this year, making 55k/yr, which is about average. I am going to be up for a raise in a couple months and I’m wondering what sort of raise I should expect? I know Java EE, CSS, AJAX, SQL, Struts, etc.

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Spring in Practice

Product Description
Spring lets developers build complex applications from loosely-coupled POJOs. A set of simple abstractions simplifies construction, testing, and deployment which makes Spring both powerful and easy-to-use. With this power comes the potential for a wide range of uses in both common and not-so-common scenarios. That’s where Spring in Practice comes in. Spring in Practice is a problem/solution book in the Manning “In Practice” series. It shows how to tackle the challen… More >>

Spring in Practice

Java EE – Hello world EJB3 in Netbeans


This is an introduction to Java EE Enterprise Java Bean (EJB 3) technology. It’s just an hello world example and this is part1. This series of posts will cover: How to create a simple ejb, How to write an standalone client application for that bean, How to deploy it on a real server etc. And there will be a screencast of every tutorial. darq.weboder.com

Java EE 5 for Elvis

Product Description
Traditionally, Enterprise Java (J2EE, now Java EE) has been viewed as a complex, high performance technology. As a result average developers (Elvis) have looked to alternatives like Spring and Hibernate. This has lead to exaggerated reports that Java EE is dead. Java EE 5 will change the game. Difficult boilerplate code is gone, replaced by simple annotations. The best ideas of Hibernate and Spring are part of EE 5. For the first time, large parts of the Java EE tec… More >>

Java EE 5 for Elvis

Struts 2 in Action

  • ISBN13: 9781933988078
  • Condition: NEW
  • Notes: Brand New from Publisher. No Remainder Mark.

Product Description
The original Struts project revolutionized Java web development and its rapid adoption resulted in the thousands of Struts-based applications deployed worldwide. Keeping pace with new ideas and trends, Apache Struts 2 has emerged as the product of a merger between the Apache Struts and OpenSymphony WebWork projects, united in their goal to develop an easy-to-use yet feature-rich framework. Struts 2 represents a revolution in design and ease of use when compared to c… More >>

Struts 2 in Action

Web Service Development for IBM websphere Application Server V7


For the full video please visit: eb5.elearn.ihost.com This course teaches students how to develop, debug, test, and monitor Web services for Java Platform, Enterprise Edition version 5 (Java EE 5) using IBM websphere Application Server V7. Java EE 5 represents a significant evolution in the Java enterprise programming model by providing application developers with considerable improvements that enhance the development experience and, in turn, productivity. The Java API for XML-Based Web Services (JAX-WS) and Java Architecture for XML Binding (JAXB) specifications in Java EE 5 provide a simplified approach to Web service development. IBM websphere Application Server V7 provides a standards-compliant runtime environment for Java EE 5 Web services.

Java Server Programming for Professionals – Covers Java EE 5

Product Description
The book has been written to provide genuine domain knowledge to programmers who wish to learn Java server-side, web-based application development, using Java EE. Learning web development is done through a set of examples and hands on exercises. We hope to encourage you to strongly reinforce your skills by developing of a Personnel Management System. THE TOPICS COVERED IN THE BOOK Overview Of Java Enterprise Edition 5 Introduction To Java, System Architecture, Intro… More >>

Java Server Programming for Professionals – Covers Java EE 5

Java EE Project using EJB 3, JPA and Struts 2 for Beginners,

Product Description
This book aims serving students, developers, technical leads and to some extent project managers or consultants by demonstrating a structured documented modestly sized project. Learning the project development and documentation is done through the construction of an Online Car Rental System using MySQL Community Server as the data store with Java Server Pages as the delivery mechanism, Struts 2 as the framework, JPA as the Specification and Hibernate 3 as the Implem… More >>

Java EE Project using EJB 3, JPA and Struts 2 for Beginners,

Cejug – Jazoon’08 – Roberto Chinnici – An Overview of the Java Platform, Enterprise Edition 6 (Java EE 6)


Jazoon’08 – Roberto Chinnici – An Overview of the Java Platform, Enterprise Edition 6 (Java EE 6)

Advantages of Application Servers in Web and Software Development

An application server is a server that hosts an application program to provide business logic for third-party application program. An application server combining or working with a web server is called a web application server in many usages. A web application server can be a flexible web application development and deployment tool.

The application server is frequently observed as a part of a three tier application, which comprises of a GUI (graphical user interface) server, business logic or application server and a database server. In a more descriptive way it can be viewed as:

  • Front end or first tier (personal computer)
  • A middle tier (an intranet server or LAN)
  • Third tier or back-end (database server)

Advantages of Application Servers in the Web and Software Development Scenario

In the web & software development scenario, an application server offers various advantages including:

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