How to Create a Java EE 6 Application with JSF 2, EJB 3.1, JPA, and NetBeans IDE 6.8

There are many articles and tutorials out there that discuss how to use the individual technologies in Java EE 6, e.g., JSF 2, EJB 3.1, JPA, etc, to develop an application, but I haven’t seen one that puts together the said technologies and showcases them in one tutorial with an end-to-end demonstration. As such, I thought I would create one here for the benefit of those who are new to JEE6 and NetBeans IDE 6.8 and those who are seriously looking at NetBeans IDE 6.8 as a tool for developing their enterprise applications.

This article published on Netbeans Zone aims to provide detailed steps to develop a web-based application based on technologies in the JEE6 specs, i.e., JavaServer Faces 2.0 (JSF), Enterprise Java Beans 3.1 (Session Bean and Message-Driven Bean) and Java Persistence API (JPA) with the help of NetBeans IDE 6.8 as the development & deployment tool. The example in this tutorial creates a web application called “CustomerApp” that performs only the Retrieve and Update functions of CRUD on the customer records provided by the NetBeans Sample database served by the Glassfish built-in database server, JavaDB (Derby). In addition to the above-mentioned technologies from JEE6, PrimeFaces for JSF2 will also be used as the Ajax-based Framework for the Web UI portion which is lacking in the stack. So, this tutorial also discusses how PrimeFaces can be integrated into NetBeans IDE and to enable Ajax capabilities for Web projects.

The objective of the tutorial is to demonstrate the ease of using the various JEE6 technologies and putting them together to create an enterprise-ready web-based application. Although the application is developed for demo purposes, its architecture represents the best practices in developing an enterprise application, whereby modularity, scalability, and reusability are taken into consideration.

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Native Seam Support Wanted for NetBeans & Glassfish

Jboss Seam logoJboss SEAM is by far the best programming framework for Java EE development as it solves most of the problems which arose for achieving a true MVC 2 implementation. All of the other frameworks like Struts and Spring MVC when used with presentation layer specifications like JSP and JSF 1.x while almost succeeding in the arena, when it came to agile development, they created at least as many other problems – if not more - as the ones they solved. Enter Jboss Seam which uses JSF 2 for the presentation layer which is truely a Java EE specification and for the rest of the MVC paradigm which consists of the business logic and the data persistence layer achieved respectively by EJB and JPA.

Joesph Faisal Nusairat had this to say in his book Beginning Jboss Seam from Novice to Professional. 

For years developers realized that the JavaServer Pages (JSP)/servlets paradigm was not enough to create enterprise-level web pages. That model provided the capability for a web tier that could pass objects from the client to the server, but essentially that was it. For most developers, this simple paradigm was not enough; more-complex operations were needed, and developers found themselves writing infrastructure code to deal with the shortcomings of the Servlet specification. Eventually, all the ideas learned from creating custom infrastructure code resulted in the web frameworks we know today, such as Apache’s Struts and Tapestry, OpenSymphony’s WebWork, and so forth. The Java community also got together and through the Java Community Process (JCP) created the JSF specification to tackle some of the issues raised and deal with the shortcomings of the Servlet specification.

Even though we now have web and business tiers with improved functionality, we have still been forced to create the plumbing code needed to connect them together. With Seam, however, these two areas can now focus more exclusively on what they do best—presentation and business logic.

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Java EE Project using EJB 3, JPA and Struts 2 for Beginners,

Product Description
This book aims serving students, developers, technical leads and to some extent project managers or consultants by demonstrating a structured documented modestly sized project. Learning the project development and documentation is done through the construction of an Online Car Rental System using MySQL Community Server as the data store with Java Server Pages as the delivery mechanism, Struts 2 as the framework, JPA as the Specification and Hibernate 3 as the Implem… More >>

Java EE Project using EJB 3, JPA and Struts 2 for Beginners,