VB 6.0 Make a shutdown, restart, logout program


A quick tutorial on how to make a program that can log you out, restart your computer and shut it down, you can use this as a system control thing, or you can make a prank out of this so that it will shut your friends computers down or whatever. Sorry that there is no sound, my mic broke ages ago and I’ve been meaning to get a new one. Remember this NEEDS Visual Basic 6.0 but I tried this on .NET and it worked also.

Understanding Variable Scope and Duration in Visual Basic 6

Variable Scope

The scope of a variable determines where you can access that variable in your code. If a variable is in scope you can read or set it’s value. If it is out of scope you will not be able to access it.

There are three types of scope for variables in Visual Basic:

Global Scope
Global variables are in scope anywhere in your application. Module Scope
Module level variables are in scope anywhere within the module where they are declared. Local Scope
Local variables are only in scope within the procedure where they are declared.

Continue reading “Understanding Variable Scope and Duration in Visual Basic 6”

When it is crunch time: Migrating from Visual Basic 6 to Visual Basic .Net/2005

Abstract

As a Visual Basic 6.0 programmer, what is the roadmap forward for your applications? As Visual Basic 6.0 becomes ‘deprecated technology’ what will you do with your enterprise class applications written in Visual Basic 6.0. This article is the musings of a developer that has been looking at migrating existing enterprise-class Visual Basic 6.0 applications to Visual Basic 2005.

Introduction

If you have been a serious Visual Basic 6.0 programmer with very sizeable code investments in Visual Basic (we have 22 enterprise level applications), at least 18 of which are written with Microsoft Visual Basic, crunch time comes when you begin to think or when you decide to advance your applications to new versions. Crunch time comes when all of a sudden, your Visual Basic 6.0 projects don’t open properly anymore in the Visual Basic 6.0 IDE (especially when running on Windows Vista with Visual Studio 2005 installed). Crunch time comes most especially when it dawns on you that you are basically using ‘deprecated’ technology, that between Visual Studio 6.0 (which contained Visual Basic 6.0) and Visual Studio 2008 (the latest version of Microsoft’s Visual Studio development suite), they have been 4 (four) new versions of Visual Basic.

Crunch time is the realization that for your software business to live, you will have to do something about your existing Visual Basic 6.0 applications. Our purpose in writing this article is to share our experiences of what we found as we endeavored to start to upgrade our Visual Basic 6.0 applications, and to discuss some of the touch decisions and choices that will undoubtedly have to be made.

Appraising the current Visual Basic situation!

Continue reading “When it is crunch time: Migrating from Visual Basic 6 to Visual Basic .Net/2005”